Useful Tips on How to Choose A Driving Or Riding Instructor

By Anne Smart, Saturday, May 5, 2012

If you want to learn how to drive, one of the most important decisions you need to face is finding the right driving or riding instructor, who can accompany you during your learning process. Although you may have thought of asking a friend or someone you are acquainted with who knows how to drive to educate you in order to save some bucks, hiring an Approved Driving Instructor (ADI) can make a huge difference on the way you think about driving safety and how you would handle driving itself.

An ADI is a car driving trainer who has been qualified by the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) to give out advise and provide the correct knowledge to learner drivers about the right driving procedures as well as practical test requirements. Accordingly, out of ten learner drivers nine managed to pass their practical test during their first try. These passers were taught and guided by an ADI instead of a friend or relative who just knows how to drive.

Proof of Qualification of ADIs and Trainees

You will be able to know if a driving instructor is a fully qualified ADI if he or she has a green badge on his or her car’s windscreen. Trainee driving instructors, on the other hand, are provided by the DSA with a trainee license (usually a pink badge) for them to get an experience before they have their qualifying test.

If your chosen driving instructor’s green or pink badge is not on display, it is vital that you ask him or her to show it to you, as this is an important proof that he or she is qualified to teach. If the person is unable to show such a badge, you need to report this to the DSA as it is likely that he or she is practicing an illegal driving instruction.

Finding An ADI

The DSA is the governing body that maintains the standards of all ADIs. If you want to make sure that you will hire the right person for the job, here are some of the most vital qualifications that you should look at based from DSA’s standard.

  • Is registered with the Driving Standard Agency
  • Has no criminal record
  • Had passed a complex theory test and practical driving test as well as a test that gauges his or her ability to provide instructions.
  • Has an authentic ADI identification certificate displayed on the tuition vehicle’s windscreen

You also have to take note that the DSA regularly checks all the ADIs standard of instruction, which are graded according to their performance.

  • 4 is an indication of a satisfactory standard of instruction
  • 5 indicates a good overall standard; and
  • 6 is the highest rate an ADI can receive

With these grades in mind, it would be wise to ask your instructor to show his or her last grade report from the DSA to know how well he or she has performed on the check test lesson. Knowing this will also ensure that your safety while taking your lessons.

Other than the standards mentioned above, an instructor should also have a good reputation, is punctual and reliable and has a training car that not only suits you, but is insured.

As with any other things, doing your own research before actually hiring a driving instructor is one of the best routes to find the right person who can impart to you all the knowledge you need to become a good driver. Spending money to hire an instructor you have not met nor spoke with is a recipe for disaster that will not only put your driving skills at risk, but your life as well.

Article was researched and written by Johnston Stewart who is a Driving Instructor in Falkirk in his spare time Johnston enjoys writing about driving test related subjects and driving subjects in general.

 Useful Tips on How to Choose A Driving Or Riding Instructor

The Article Scholar:

Anne Smart is a resident Author of ArticleScholar. Before venturing into Social Media Optimization, Pro Blogging and Freelance Writing on the Web, she served as a Marketing Consultant for a Fortune 500 Company.

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